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  1. In theory, it is possible to adjust inflation measures to account for the many constant changes in prices resulting from changing demand, quality, and innovations. But it's essentially impossible to execute these adjustments accurately.

    This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Millian Quinteros.

    Original Article: "Why Official Inflation Measures Don't Work"

  2. Thanks to past interventions, the economy is now rife with malinvestments and prices that don't reflect real demand. The solution is to allow deflation and other types of painful readjustment. Otherwise true growth will elude us.

    This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Millian Quinteros.

    Original Article: "How Government Intervention Triggers Depressions"

  3. Some claim "the rich" will be fine—or even better off—after the COVID panic destroys the economy for most of us. But there's a problem: the wealthy depend heavily on an economy fueled by the production and consumption of all workers and entrepreneurs.

    This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Millian Quinteros.

    Original Article: "We’re All in This Together. But Not in the Way You Think."

  4. The editors of The Babylon Bee have a podcast, and they invited Bob on to discuss the economic situation. Then, they asked a series of fun questions, against the backdrop of their shared Christianity.

    For more information, see BobMurphyShow.com. The Bob Murphy Show is also available on iTunes, Stitcher, Spotify, and via RSS.

  5. Central banks have decided that one of their main missions is to prevent deflation. But this only ends up causing the malinvestments that lead to economic busts.

    This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Millian Quinteros.

    Original Article: "Let's Hope Deflation Is Headed Our Way"

  6. Our guest is Eric Weinhandl, an epidemiologist whose investigation of a JAMA paper on dialysis patients lead to its retraction—and subsequent republication.

    Eric discusses the steps leading to the paper’s eventual retraction, and what this signals about the larger research enterprise. Eric also discusses the role of bias, conflicts of interest, big data and home dialysis, as well as some thoughts on the field of epidemiology during the COVID pandemic.

    Eric Weinhandl is an epidemiologist with fourteen years of research experience in kidney disease, mostly regarding dialysis and pharmaceuticals. Eric worked at the United States Renal Data System (USRDS) Coordinating Center between 2004 and 2015 and has conducted studies with Amgen, Baxter, DaVita, NxStage, Sigma Tau, and the Peer Kidney Care Initiative.

    He recently worked for Fresenius Medical Care, one of the major dialysis companies in the United States, and currently works with the chronic disease research group as part of the Hennepin County Medical Center.

  7. Buyers and sellers in the free market do indeed act from self-interest, but Adam Smith never argued that this excludes friendly feelings for those they do business with.

    This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Millian Quinteros.

    Original Article: "Adam Smith and Benevolence"

  8. For many parents, the ongoing closure of public schools will just reinforce growing suspicions that public schools just aren't worth it anymore. Maybe they never were.

    This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Millian Quinteros.

    Original Article: "The School Closures Are a Big Threat to the Power of Public Schools"

  9. Paul Krugman is now claiming that reopening the economy and allowing people to go to work almost surely will cause a depression.

    This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Millian Quinteros.

    Original Article: "Krugman: We Need More Unemployment—to Save Us from Unemployment"

  10. Hacking off soldiers' limbs was a favorite technique of Civil War surgeons, largely because doctors wanted to avoid blame for later cases of gangrene. So doctors erred on the "safe" side. Many patients may have disagreed.

    This Audio Mises Wire is generously sponsored by Christopher Condon. Narrated by Millian Quinteros.

    Original Article: "Hacksawing the Economy: How Lockdowns Are in the Tradition of Civil War Surgeons"